On the theory and measurement of technological change
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On the theory and measurement of technological change by Murray Brown

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Published by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Economic development -- Mathematical models,
  • Technology -- History

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index

Statementby Murray Brown
The Physical Object
Paginationxii, 214 p. :
Number of Pages214
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14554382M

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Theory of Technical Change and Economic Invariance: Application of Lie Groups presents the economic invariance problems observable behavior under general transformations such as taste change or technical change. This book covers a variety of topics in economic theory, ranging from the analysis of production functions to the general. : On the theory and measurement of technological change: Murray Brown: Books. Skip to main content. Try Prime Hello, Sign in Account & Lists Sign in Account & Lists Orders Try Prime Cart. Books. Go Search Today's Deals Best Sellers Find a Gift Customer Service New. Theories of Technological and Industrial Change and the Measurement of Innovation Conference Paper (PDF Available) February with Reads How we measure 'reads'. The Economic Theory of Price Indices: Two Essays on the Effects of Taste, Quality, and Technological Change is concerned with the effects of consumer taste, product quality, and technological change on price indices. Special attention is paid on technological change in the simple two-sector production model of Rybczynski and Uzawa.

Technological change (TC) or technological development, is the overall process of invention, innovation and diffusion of technology or processes. In essence, technological change covers the invention of technologies (including processes) and their commercialization or release as open source via research and development (producing emerging technologies), the continual . What Is Technological Change. In economics, a technological change is an increase in the efficiency of a product or process that results in an increase . Moreover, "super-normal benefits of technological change" as "the sum of all associated output increases and cost reductions accruing to anyone in the economy minus the new technology's. In this astute and elegantly written book, Douglas Allen argues that the industrial revolution was accompanied by an institutional revolution. This institutional revolution replaced many seemingly archaic institutions such as the practice of restricting some offices in government to aristocrats while selling others (including army commissions.

Evidence of technological change is all around us—smartphones, self-driving cars, amazing drug discoveries, and even drone warfare. With all of this novelty many futurists and other pundits breathlessly proclaim that technological change is speeding up. In fact, some go so far as to claim that the pace of innovation is not only accelerating, it is accelerating exponentially (which, .   The Economic Theory of Price Indices: Two Essays on the Effects of Taste, Quality, and Technological Change is concerned with the effects of consumer taste, product quality, and technological change on price indices. Special attention is paid on technological change in the simple two-sector production model of Rybczynski and Edition: 1.   Analysis of countries as diverse as Japan, the Soviet Union and the United Kingdom demonstrates that there is an interdependence between technological change and the institutional and cultural characteristics of different countries, which can have a profound effect on their rates of by: 3 to have been largely labor saving.2 More recently, theories of induced technological change were revived as the new growth theory, pioneered by Robert Lucas and Paul Romer.3 This has blossomed into a major research field, with a wide variety of theories and applications.4 Virtually all studies of induced innovation have been theoretical.